IHS BLOG

Art Students Visit Kochi

     

 

Though I’ve heard about various forms of art, until this trip I had never seen or experienced such a mind-blowing art exhibition. The Kochi-Muziris Biennale is an international art exhibition where over a hundred artists from around the world display their work. Most of the art there is contemporary artwork, which means it is the very latest in what artists are doing now. Much of it is conceptual, where the ideas of the artists are just as important as the way it looks or how it’s made. This made our gallery visits quite interesting, as we often had to do some detective work to understand what the artist was trying to say.  After seeing the kind of art that was on display, my entire perception of art has changed.

The most unique thing about this Biennale was that the art pieces incorporated all the five senses. In the installation by artist/poet Raúl Zurita, a hall slightly bigger than Tarana was filled with water. The artist’s poem entitled ‘The Sea of Pain’ was projected onto the walls, his intention for viewers to walk through the hall and actually feel the message that he was trying to convey.

Not all the work included in the Biennale was contemporary. I particularly liked the intricate Pichvai paintings, a traditional Rajasthani art form. On these Indian temple hangings, painted on cotton cloth, Krishna is depicted in a myriad of forms Interestingly, in temples, these paintings are placed like a background behind the decorated deity.

Our group from Home School had the privilege of interacting both with the founder and president of the  Kochi-Muzuris Biennale Foundation, Bose Krishnamachari, as well as the Artistic Director of this year’s Biennale, Sudarshan Shetty, an internationally renowned artist himself. We were grateful to have the opportunity to hear from them about the vision and mission of such a huge undertaking and what is required to create an event of this kind.

Not only did we get an exposure to all kinds of art at the Biennale, but we also visited the Kerala Folklore Museum where we were awed by the myriad of traditional paintings, intricate sculptures and artifacts we saw there. The architecture of the museum itself was not to be missed.